If our values are to be true, Action Property Management must be a “No Tolerance Zone” for gossip.  We “assume the best in each other”.  We will always “be respectful”.  “We are a Team”.  We want to “show genuine interest in individuals’ quality of life.”  None of this can happen where gossip exists.  This video helps us understand the nature of gossip at work and protect against its infestation.

Why Gossip Starts & Spreads at Work – Joe Mull

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36 thoughts on “Why Gossip Starts & Spreads at Work – Joe Mull

  1. Which of Action’s Value Statements are addressed by the content of this video and how do the values apply to what he is saying?

    The video really touches on We Care About People and We Are A Team. In our office we are really like a family. If there is an issue that arises with one of our team members we talk about it with them directly. I think this really starts with assuming the best in others and being respectful. If we assume the best in others then I think a lot of the gossip and other issues go away. This is something I really try to practice at work and in my home life.

    1. I agree with Arielle that the video touches on the importance of assuming the best in others as a fundamental way to combat gossip. Additionally, if we are making collaboration and open communication routine, even if that means saying things that challenge people a little bit, we are avoiding the urge to complain about people or policies behind people’s backs and having a direct and open conversation about it which is more likely to result in positive change.

  2. Some may find it hard to approach a co-worker and do as this gentleman suggested however, I believe that with time and good examples this can take seed in a positive work place and encourage growth amongst any team.

  3. The video addresses Action’s Value of Assuming the best in others. He talks about how when someone does something that is questionable, our minds don’t usually decide it is due to a situation but rather due to their character and start to make a list of character flaws. He gave a really good example of this when he asked the question about what we think when someone is late. Perhaps to a lead or manager of a group it is easier to assume the best in their team members as they have more of a bigger picture of someone than one of their other peers. We may know that someone is late because they had a flat tire or they weren’t feeling well but no one else may know that and now someone may tell someone else how John Smith is always late because he just isn’t responsible and doesn’t care. Unfortunately, people sometimes paint a picture of someone to others without even getting to know the person themselves. Assuming the best in others will not only help the person we are assuming the best in, the person assuming the best will also benefit with the positive environment and state of mind.
    I really liked when he said “It is almost always easier to seek out the comfort of validation than to step into the discomfort of confrontation”. This truly sounds like it’s the biggest reason why gossip starts. I don’t think people mean to start gossip but instead sort of vent without realizing the negative impact it may have when what they are saying is one sided and they don’t have the full picture. I think the simplest way to help minimize these things at work is to talk about it like we are doing now with the rest of the team. Show them videos like these that can help put things into prospective rather than us just telling them to assume the best in others and stop all gossip. The leads and managers can set the tone to how the rest of the team perceives someone. We can be the Angel on their shoulder.

  4. Gossip by definition is nearly always negative, and really the direct opposite of assuming the best in others (not to mention being respectful). Assuming the best in others is a value for daily life, and if we keep that in mind gossip should not occur. Many people do not realize the impact that gossip can have, and while it is pervasive in society it has absolutely no place within the Action team.

  5. Which of Action’s Value Statements are addressed by the content of this video and how do the values apply to what he is saying?

    It is my opinion the video touches on the following two Action Value statements below:

    We care about people
    We are a team

    Its important employees practice the two core behaviors mentioned in the video to promote healthy conflict in the workplace. Lets face it colleagues are going to talk, so lets all work on assuming the best in others, spread positive information in a positive light and if something is wrong make a diligent effort to go directly to the source to bring resolution to the problem at hand rather then create more toxicity. There is power in kindness.

  6. The video speaks directly to two Action Value Statements:

    1. We Care About People
    2. We Are A Team

    In our office you will sometimes hear someone say “3.2 milliseconds”. Everyone knows this means someone either made a negative comment or was projecting negative behavior, and their fellow team member is reminding them that it only takes 3.2 milliseconds to negatively impact the mood of everyone in the office. Even if the other person tries to defend their position, the behavior either stops or they will speak directly to the real issue of what is bothering them. This has created an environment where they feel free to walk in and announce I am having a bad day, if I say or do anything wrong, please do not take it personally. Their fellow team members respond positively. When they understand it is not about them they are able to show more compassion for what the other person is feeling.

    We also discuss openly about the importance of a positive work environment. I believe the changes on hiring new staff based on Action Values has also helped. However, it is still best to openly communicate your expectations and find out what works best for your group to hold each other accountable to maintain a positive workplace.

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